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Building a new life in the UK

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  • LAWYER RESPONSE Building a new life in the UK


    Hi

    My parents-in-laws arrived in the UK on EUSS FP and have applied for PSS. As they are building their new life here in this country, I was wondering if there are any charities or forums that can help them with practical issues such as looking for a job/applying for a job, taking English lessons, opening banks accounts, housing benefits, etc?

    Thank you so much

  • #2
    Originally posted by adyanow View Post
    Hi

    My parents-in-laws arrived in the UK on EUSS FP and have applied for PSS. As they are building their new life here in this country, I was wondering if there are any charities or forums that can help them with practical issues such as looking for a job/applying for a job, taking English lessons, opening banks accounts, housing benefits, etc?

    Thank you so much
    Afternoon,

    There are social media groups for everything these days, including some for people from specific countries/languages/backgrounds. For example, for Germans, Italians, Poles, Danes, etc. in the UK. These groups are often run in their own language, useful for those not fluent in English. As with everything, there are two sides to every coin: while such social media groups can be very useful, the fact anyone can post also means not all the info provided there is always accurate, but there can be useful pointers to be had. Also worth looking into local groups.

    Looking for work is very generic, it would depend on what kind of work they are looking for. These days, most jobs are advertised, and applied for, online, there are numerous job boards, such as Indeed, which seems to cover all areas, as well as more specialist ones for certain lines of work. I don't even know whether it's still possible to get jobs in cafes, bars, shops, etc. by turning up like in the old days as opposed to having to apply online to start with.

    Their first step should be to apply for a national insurance number (NIN): Apply for a National Insurance number - GOV.UK . Although it is possible to start work without it as noted on the website, it should also help with opening a bank account. The main issue with bank accounts is that they require proof of address, this has been the case since money laundering legislation was introduced in the early '90s. It may be worth putting their names down on some household bills in order to obtain this proof of address

    There used to be free language courses for immigrants in the UK, these are less common these days, but there are still some organised by colleges and local authorities, may be worth looking for ESOL (English as a Second Language) courses. With the infamous Covid restrictions now finally lifted, I expect to see more courses being launched after the summer holidays. Worth enquiring locally.

    The CABs (Citizens Advice Bureaux) can be useful sources of info regarding things like benefits, but do bear in mind there may be issues claiming them with pre-settled status, as noted here: Pre-settled status and access to benefits - UKCEN Citizenship and Residence for European Nationals and their families

    I'm not aware of any charity organisations who assist everyone with these matters as such, but there may be local organisations as well as some geared towards certain nationalities or groups of people, for example, the Eastern European Resource Centre (EERC) and INCA CGIL (for Italians).

    If you have any specific queries, you may post them up here and we'll do our best to help!




    I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you so much. I have some specific questions

      1. In my home country, immigrants receive support to integrate in the society. For instance, language courses or vocational skill courses to improve their employability. Are there (free) courses like these for new arrivals here?

      2. My mother-in-law used to be a hairdresser in her home country. She is wondering where should she start here if she wants to work in this industry. Do the Job centres offer this kind of consultation and support for instance to tell her if she needs qualifications or if she can get apprenticeship?

      3. Can we apply NINO for them now (they only have Family Permit and waiting for PSS) or can they apply only after they receive their PSS?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by adyanow View Post
        Thank you so much. I have some specific questions

        1. In my home country, immigrants receive support to integrate in the society. For instance, language courses or vocational skill courses to improve their employability. Are there (free) courses like these for new arrivals here?

        2. My mother-in-law used to be a hairdresser in her home country. She is wondering where should she start here if she wants to work in this industry. Do the Job centres offer this kind of consultation and support for instance to tell her if she needs qualifications or if she can get apprenticeship?

        3. Can we apply NINO for them now (they only have Family Permit and waiting for PSS) or can they apply only after they receive their PSS?
        Aron F (lawyer) would you be able to help with these questions? Many thanks.

        I am the Group Founder and also an Admin, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and ResponsibilitiesIf you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by adyanow View Post
          Thank you so much. I have some specific questions

          1. In my home country, immigrants receive support to integrate in the society. For instance, language courses or vocational skill courses to improve their employability. Are there (free) courses like these for new arrivals here?
          Afternoon,

          As per my previous response, some organisations do provide these courses, but they are local, rather than countrywide, so you really need to look at what's available in your area.

          Originally posted by adyanow View Post
          2. My mother-in-law used to be a hairdresser in her home country. She is wondering where should she start here if she wants to work in this industry. Do the Job centres offer this kind of consultation and support for instance to tell her if she needs qualifications or if she can get apprenticeship?
          From experience, job centres are mainly concerned with people putting a lot of effort into finding work and accepting any work that's available rather than helping with professional career development, however, things do vary widely from time to time and from advisor to advisor, so it's worth asking, obviously this would only be possible if she is claiming benefits, as Job Centres stopped being job centres as such years ago, with the arrival of the internet. I'm old enough to remember the days when anyone could just pop in and look at the job cards to see if there was something for them, even when not claiming benefits, but this was in a different millennium. These days, job centres are really benefits centres, there are no job adverts on the premises, only online, and their online systems are only available to registered claimants.

          Hair dressing should be one of the easiest skills to transfer to another country, since it doesn't require too much command of the language and hair is hair, regardless of the country. May be worth asking round local hair salons for an opportunity to be an apprentice with them, although this may not be necessary if she is already a skilled and experienced hairdresser.

          Originally posted by adyanow View Post
          3. Can we apply NINO for them now (they only have Family Permit and waiting for PSS) or can they apply only after they receive their PSS?
          It is my understanding that the DWP has been asking for pre-settled status, but this is something you need to ask them directly.

          Hopefully our lawyer will be able to provide further details.

          I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi, your parents-in-law can apply for a NI number. The link for applying is here.

            The following article can be useful: Good news for EU citizens making late applications for post-Brexit residence rights - Free Movement

            I am an Immigration Adviser with Clowes Bureaucracy Experts LTD, authorised by the Office of Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) to provide immigration advice at level 2, and a member of the UK Immigration Law Practitioners Association (ILPA). I am also a volunteer with UKCEN, where I provide one-off advice on a pro-bono basis. This advice should not be considered a substitute for formal legal advice. Please see Aron F for full details.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you so much. Is it possible for parents-in-law who are here in family permit (and have not received their PSS but have applied) to apply for any benefits? They are 60 and 65. Is there a difference as what kind of benefits they can be eligible for? They are not currently working though they are trying very hard to find jobs.

              I read somewhere that they can get their NHS prescriptions for free and also free bus tickets. Is that really so? How does one apply for these concessions?

              Comment


              • #8
                Unless at least one of them is working or at least or or your spouse is working or have settled status they are currently not eligible for benefits.

                They are automatically entitled to free NHS treatments and prescriptions as they live in the UK and are over 60 (check here). There is no need for an application.

                Depending on where they live they may be entitled for free bus tickets. You can check here.

                I am an Immigration Adviser with Clowes Bureaucracy Experts LTD, authorised by the Office of Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) to provide immigration advice at level 2, and a member of the UK Immigration Law Practitioners Association (ILPA). I am also a volunteer with UKCEN, where I provide one-off advice on a pro-bono basis. This advice should not be considered a substitute for formal legal advice. Please see Aron F for full details.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Aron F View Post
                  Unless at least one of them is working or at least or or your spouse is working or have settled status they are currently not eligible for benefits.
                  Thank you. My husband and I both work (I am employed and he is self-employed). We have been living in the UK since 2017 and hold PSS. Does it mean the parents-in-law are eligible for be benefits? or did you mean that we need to be working AND have Settled status?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by adyanow View Post

                    Thank you. My husband and I both work (I am employed and he is self-employed). We have been living in the UK since 2017 and hold PSS. Does it mean the parents-in-law are eligible for be benefits? or did you mean that we need to be working AND have Settled status?
                    Aron F

                    I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you have PSS and at least one of you is working then your parents-in-law are eligible for benefits.

                      I am an Immigration Adviser with Clowes Bureaucracy Experts LTD, authorised by the Office of Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) to provide immigration advice at level 2, and a member of the UK Immigration Law Practitioners Association (ILPA). I am also a volunteer with UKCEN, where I provide one-off advice on a pro-bono basis. This advice should not be considered a substitute for formal legal advice. Please see Aron F for full details.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Aron F View Post
                        If you have PSS and at least one of you is working then your parents-in-law are eligible for benefits.
                        Thank you. Can we apply for them now that they are here on family permit? or are they only eligible once their own PSS is approved?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by adyanow View Post

                          Thank you. Can we apply for them now that they are here on family permit? or are they only eligible once their own PSS is approved?
                          Aron F

                          I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            They can apply even when they are here only on a family permit.

                            I am an Immigration Adviser with Clowes Bureaucracy Experts LTD, authorised by the Office of Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) to provide immigration advice at level 2, and a member of the UK Immigration Law Practitioners Association (ILPA). I am also a volunteer with UKCEN, where I provide one-off advice on a pro-bono basis. This advice should not be considered a substitute for formal legal advice. Please see Aron F for full details.

                            Comment

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