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NHS for British Citizens living abroad

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  • NHS for British Citizens living abroad

    Hello I was born in England and am a british citizen, I got married and moved to Canada but i was wondering if i am eligible for any NHS coverage when i come back to the UK since i still have a British passport (I visit my family in the UK often)

    Also I had a daughter in Canada, she has a canadian passport but is a british citizen by decent through me so does she have any coverage by the NHS?

  • #2
    Originally posted by M.bozai View Post
    Hello I was born in England and am a british citizen, I got married and moved to Canada but i was wondering if i am eligible for any NHS coverage when i come back to the UK since i still have a British passport (I visit my family in the UK often)
    Afternoon,

    You will find the info here: Using the NHS when you return to live in the UK - GOV.UK

    ...where it says:

    If you are a UK national living abroad and are returning to live in the UK, you will be able to use the NHS for your healthcare.

    You will need to complete a GMS1 form to register with a GP near your home. See how to register with a GP practice Prove you are eligible for free healthcare

    The first time you have treatment anywhere in the NHS you will need to bring proof that you are eligible for free healthcare. You should bring at least two of the following documents:

    Residence in the UK
    • Proof of your purchase of property or a tenancy agreement
    • Recent utility or council tax bill payment
    • UK bank account showing recent UK activity

    Employment status
    • Payslip or letter from employer
    • Bank statement
    • Unique tax reference number
    • Documentation from your local job centre to show that you are receiving job-seekers allowance

    You can also use documents that prove you no longer live abroad. For example, paperwork to show that you have:
    • sold or rented your house in your previous country of residence
    • terminated employment or studies in your previous country of residence
    • shipped goods or transferred assets to the UK
    • ended insurance policies and utility contracts
    Emergency treatment

    If you need A&E services, this will always be free and you will not be asked to show that you live here unless you go to hospital for further treatment.
    That means you will be eligible for free NHS treatment if you show you have returned here to live, not just for a visit. I know British citizens who have had to pay for hospital services, such as pre-natal care, because they had been living abroad.

    I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by M.bozai View Post
      Also I had a daughter in Canada, she has a canadian passport but is a british citizen by decent through me so does she have any coverage by the NHS?
      I have answered your other thread about that here: Link

      As a Canadian citizen, the answer is no, she wouldn't have free NHS access, as noted here: Visitors from outside the European Economic Area (EEA) - NHS

      ...where it says:

      If you're visiting England from a non-EEA country, even if you're a former UK resident, you'll be charged for NHS secondary care at 150% of the standard NHS rate, unless an exemption from the charge category applies to either you or the treatment.

      You should make sure you're covered for healthcare through personal medical or travel insurance for the duration of your visit.

      You'll need to pay the full estimated cost in advance if the treatment you need is non-urgent, otherwise the treatment will not be provided.

      If you're a non-EEA national and you fail to pay for NHS treatment when a charge applies, any future immigration application you make may be denied.

      Some NHS services or treatments are exempt from charges so that they're free to all (although prescription, dentistry and other charges may still apply).

      These include:
      You say she is British by descent, however, without a British passport to prove it, it may be difficult to establish this fact directly to the NHS, who would treat her as a Canadian citizen, subject to the above. As per my other thread, I see no harm in applying for a British passport for her, and this is yet another reason for it.

      I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

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      • #4
        Perfect! Thank you very much for your help

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