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Impact of naturalisation

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  • Impact of naturalisation

    Hi, I'm sorry if the answer has already been posted in this thread but I have used your services about a year ago and I am now a dual British-French citizen (same situation as Katinchen). I understand that we cannot apply for the SS, I also understand that you cannot usually request support from your embassy if you hold the citizenship of the country where you reside (which is our case) but I am also wondering about the potential further consequences of the Lounes case on dual citizens like us in relation with the WA.

    For instance, the NHS states that "You'll still be able to access healthcare through EHIC for visits that begin after 1 January 2021 if you're an EU national living in the UK before 31 December 2020":
    Applying for healthcare cover abroad (GHIC and EHIC) - NHS

    Since we are still EU nationals but cannot prove we were in Britain before Brexit, how can we make sure that our rights are protected under the WA?

    Many thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Originally posted by emmanuel_londonSW View Post
    Hi, I'm sorry if the answer has already been posted in this thread but I have used your services about a year ago and I am now a dual British-French citizen (same situation as Katinchen). I understand that we cannot apply for the SS, I also understand that you cannot usually request support from your embassy if you hold the citizenship of the country where you reside (which is our case) but I am also wondering about the potential further consequences of the Lounes case on dual citizens like us in relation with the WA.
    Hi,

    I have moved this post to a new thread to avoid confusion on the other one.

    We have a dedicated article regarding the impact of naturalisation on family members as per the Lounes case: Naturalisation and impact on spouses and family members - UKCEN Citizenship and Residence for European Nationals and their families

    We also got this article published the other day: How settled status can become a trap for non-EU family members of dual EU-British citizens - Europe Street News

    Originally posted by emmanuel_londonSW View Post
    For instance, the NHS states that "You'll still be able to access healthcare through EHIC for visits that begin after 1 January 2021 if you're an EU national living in the UK before 31 December 2020":
    Applying for healthcare cover abroad (GHIC and EHIC) - NHS

    Since we are still EU nationals but cannot prove we were in Britain before Brexit, how can we make sure that our rights are protected under the WA?

    Many thanks in advance.
    As you say, we are still EU nationals, and it shouldn't be difficult to prove you were living here before Brexit if required, it doesn't refer specifically to status under the EUSS.

    I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by emmanuel_londonSW View Post
      I understand that we cannot apply for the SS, I also understand that you cannot usually request support from your embassy if you hold the citizenship of the country where you reside (which is our case) but I am also wondering about the potential further consequences of the Lounes case on dual citizens like us in relation with the WA.
      This is news to me. I also travel to EU with my Italian passport, let's suppose I have an accident in Greece: do you mean I cannot contact the Italian embassy in Athens despite I have no British passport with me?
      I might have no right to healthcare, but it seems strange to me one cannot actually call the embassy of the country on whose passport I am travelling.....

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SavedBytheBell View Post

        This is news to me. I also travel to EU with my Italian passport, let's suppose I have an accident in Greece: do you mean I cannot contact the Italian embassy in Athens despite I have no British passport with me?
        I might have no right to healthcare, but it seems strange to me one cannot actually call the embassy of the country on whose passport I am travelling.....
        It is still possible to contact the embassy of your country of origin in case of emergency abroad even if one has dual nationality.

        I am the Group Founder and also an Admin, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and ResponsibilitiesIf you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SavedBytheBell View Post

          This is news to me. I also travel to EU with my Italian passport, let's suppose I have an accident in Greece: do you mean I cannot contact the Italian embassy in Athens despite I have no British passport with me?
          Not sure where you got that information from but it's not correct, in fact, it is my understanding that EU nationals can also get help from the embassy of another EU country if required, not only their own. And if you have an Italian passport on you, they won't know that you are also British to start with, so this won't even come up.

          But if you had an accident on holiday, your embassy wouldn't really be able to help much, where they can help is if your passport is lost or stolen, or you are detained by the authorities of the country where you are, something like that.

          Originally posted by SavedBytheBell View Post

          I might have no right to healthcare, but it seems strange to me one cannot actually call the embassy of the country on whose passport I am travelling.....
          If you need medical attention, the EHIC will still be valid till the end of this year, in fact, I have read that EU nationals in the UK will still be able to apply for EHICs next year, the exclusion for dual nationals (from next year), seems to be for those who were born British and then got another EU citizenship rather than the other way round. I'm sure we'll know more about how exactly all this is going to work before the end of this year anyway.

          In any case, it's always advisable to have travel insurance, it costs very little and covers much more than just medical treatment, such as missed flights and extra hotel nights for family members while their family member is receiving treatment/hospitalised, etc. The advantage of the EHIC is mainly when the holder has pre-existing conditions excluded by their travel insurance. I wouldn't rely on the Italian Embassy if I had an accident abroad! Get travel insurance!

          I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

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