Peace and Solidarity

Announcement

Collapse

THIS FORUM IS NOW CLOSED

If you would like to see this valuable resource remain open as a respoitory, we need your help with the cost of hosting it: Help us keep this site online


Unfortunately our funding came to an end. We achieved what we set out to do since 2016, which was to help as many people as possible, to secure their status here in the UK after Brexit. It was a great pleasure to be here for all of you during all these years and to share the joy of all your success stories. Each and every success made our day, as did your support and very kind words.

See more
See less

EUSS FP with not exactly a birth certificate

Collapse
X
Collapse
Who has read this thread:
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LAWYER RESPONSE EUSS FP with not exactly a birth certificate

    Good afternoon,

    I’m trying to get my mother an EUSS FP. She’s non-EU, I’m an EU PSS holder.
    I was born in Finland, where there is no such thing as a birth certificate, only an extract from the population information system titled “Person and family relationships information” you can request at any given time that looks like this:

    First name
    Last name
    DoB
    etc.

    FATHER
    First Name
    Last name
    DoB
    etc.

    MOTHER
    First Name
    Last name
    DoB
    etc.
    Could you please clarify if such a document will satisfy the caseworkers?

    Does it make any difference that in my case there has never been such a thing as a birth certificate per regulations of my country of birth that is also a part of the EU, as opposed to the cases when people were indeed issued with a birth certificate but don’t have it any more and tried to apply with an alternative document?

    Or does it mean that the only way for a born in an EU country that doesn’t issue birth certificates is to provide a DNA test result (which isn’t supposed to be a requirement in the first place)?

    I’ve read quite a few threads here, and still get quite a contradicting conclusion.

    The following evidence is required:

    a relevant document issued on the basis of that relationship, such as a residence card or a family permit (EEA FP); or
    full birth certificate; or
    other documents which satisfy the caseworker of the family relationship.
    Originally posted by Site Admin View Post

    I have seen other refusals with family certificates, luckily you got your birth certificate.

    Thank you so much for all your help. I owe my opportunity to live in the UK to this forum and all of you!

  • #2
    Tariq N (lawyer) Would you be able to comment on this?

    I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities.

    Comment


    • #3
      Tariq N

      I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities.

      Comment


      • #4
        I didn't know this before. I assumed a birth certificate was widely issued at birth in Europe. As long as you explain the situation in Finland and provided additional information such as hospital records of your birth you should be fine.
        A birth certificate should establish 2 things: the date of birth and relationship to parents. A DNA is not required, unless you think it will help, and all it does is confirm the relationship.

        I am the Principal of the Practice ACS Visas and I am a Level 3 Regulated Adviser, authorised by the Office of Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) to provide advice in both Immigration and Asylum. I am also a volunteer with UKCEN, where I provide one-off advice on a pro-bono basis. This advice should not be considered a substitute for formal legal advice. Please see Tariq N for full details.

        Comment

        Working...
        X