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EUSS after ILR: do I have to wait for 12 months to naturalise?

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  • EUSS after ILR: do I have to wait for 12 months to naturalise?

    I have had ILR for a long time, but could not apply for naturalisation this year because of the lockdown.
    My question: If I apply for EUSS now (before the end of Dec 2020), will I have to wait for 12 months to apply for naturalisation or can I do it sooner on the basis of my ILR issued in ~2004?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Papadoc View Post
    I have had ILR for a long time, but could not apply for naturalisation this year because of the lockdown.
    My question: If I apply for EUSS now (before the end of Dec 2020), will I have to wait for 12 months to apply for naturalisation or can I do it sooner on the basis of my ILR issued in ~2004?
    Morning,

    There's been a lot of confusion regarding what does and doesn't need to happen before the end of this year. In this case, the end of the year is not relevant to any of what you mention above.
    1. There is no requirement to apply for settled status before the end of December, the deadline to apply is the end of June, the end of December is just the cut off date for new arrivals to come here and be eligible for pre-settled status, not at all appilcable to people who've lived here 5 years or longer.
    2. Applicants who are not married to a British spouse need to have had ILR, including settled status, for at least 12 months when they apply for citizenship.
    3. People who have ILR do not need to apply for settled status at all, since they already have ILR, however, we strongly recommend applying for settled status anyway, for the following reasons:
      1. The other ILR lapses after two years out of the UK, while settled status allows up to five years;
      2. There are no family reunion rights with the other ILR, while settled status allows you to sponsor close family members, for example, parents;
      3. An ILR stamp in a passport or residence permit or a letter from the Home Office can be easily lost or damaged, while settled status is a digital status, so you wouldn't rely on an old document to prove your rights when you need to.
    4. People with ILR still need to apply for settled status before the end of June if they wish to do so, obviously not if they apply for citizenship, since their ILR is still valid.
    5. ILR, other than settled status can also be used to apply for citizenship, the main difference is that you would need to provide evidence of residence since the time ILR was granted, i.e. 2004.
    6. There is no reason to apply for citizenship before the end of this year unless you are a German national, this is because Germany only allows dual nationality with another EU country, but I've checked your profile and you are not German.
    7. If you decide to apply for citizenship with your ILR, you don't need settled status, but we strongly recommend waiting till after the new year, you won't be able to find a biometric appointment this year anyway, probably not until February.

    I trust the above will have clarified a few points that are not always clear, so you can enjoy the festive season, knowing you don't really need to take any action before the end of this year.

    I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

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    • #3
      We have put together the following resources which should be your starting point.Also refer to this post: Issues, mistakes, errors and ommisions

      ....and, before going further, you should also be aware of the potential impact on family members you may wish to sponsor in the future.

      Meanwhile, have a lovely Christmas!

      I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

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      • #4
        Is this going to be an issue? I've requested the Open University to add the middle name to an already issued BSc degree certificate, but they refused. Would I be OK or should I pay the £100+ language exam fee and not worry about it?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Papadoc View Post
          Is this going to be an issue? I've requested the Open University to add the middle name to an already issued BSc degree certificate, but they refused. Would I be OK or should I pay the £100+ language exam fee and not worry about it?
          Afternoon,

          I've moved your post to your previous thread as it refers to the same application.

          I can't see it being an issue not having your middle name, you can write a note in your cover letter. It's not unusual for people in the UK not to use our middle names on a day-to-day basis and not have them included in most documents, even when they appear on our passports.

          I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

          Comment


          • #6
            Many thanks for the clarification!

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