Peace and Solidarity

Announcement

Collapse

THIS FORUM IS NOW CLOSED

If you would like to see this valuable resource remain open as a respoitory, we need your help with the cost of hosting it: Help us keep this site online


Unfortunately our funding came to an end. We achieved what we set out to do since 2016, which was to help as many people as possible, to secure their status here in the UK after Brexit. It was a great pleasure to be here for all of you during all these years and to share the joy of all your success stories. Each and every success made our day, as did your support and very kind words.

See more
See less

PhD certificate misplaced and no official transcript can be issued

Collapse
X
Collapse
Who has read this thread:
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LAWYER RESPONSE PhD certificate misplaced and no official transcript can be issued

    Hello,

    I am planning to use the PhD that I was awarded by a UK university to prove that I meet the language requirement in my UK citizenship application by naturalisation and I just realised that I misplaced the certificate (I blame the numerous house moves). The university will take up to 5 months to reissue a new certificate but I did not want to wait that long - my plan was to submit my application in the next couple of weeks. I have an original and official letter from the university with my name, the name of the institution, my degree and confirmation of the award. However, the letter clearly states the following regarding the transcripts:

    "No official transcripts are issued for research degrees by [name of university] and no records are kept of hours of attendance. The relevant teachers are required, however, before a student enters for any examination which is a component part of a degree examination, to certify that he or she has attended to their satisfaction the course or courses prescribed in the Regulations for that degree."

    I was planning to explain the situation in a cover letter and to include this excerpt so the officer examining my case does not miss it. Would this be enough proof?

    I really would not want to wait up to 5 month to submit the application but I also would not want to waste the money of the application fee.

    I also hold a PGCert from another UK university but I read in the guidance that this certificate is not accepted.

    Many thanks!

  • #2
    Hello,

    Please delete my other post as this one contains more information.

    I am planning to use the PhD that I was awarded by a UK university to prove that I meet the language requirement in my UK citizenship application by naturalisation and I just realised that I misplaced the certificate (I blame the numerous house moves). The university will take up to 5 months to reissue a new certificate but I did not want to wait that long - my plan was to submit my application in the next couple of weeks.

    The guidance explains that when the certificate is missing one can provide one of the following
    1. an original and official transcript with your name, the name of the institution, your degree and confirmation of the award; or
    2. an original and official letter from your university confirming it can’t reissue your certificate or when it will be issued.
    I cannot obtain letter in 2 as the university does re-issue certificates (but it's not convenient for me to wait). As for the letter in 1, I have an original and official letter from the university with my name, the name of the institution, my degree and confirmation of the award. However, the letter clearly states the following regarding the transcripts:

    "No official transcripts are issued for research degrees by [name of university] and no records are kept of hours of attendance. The relevant teachers are required, however, before a student enters for any examination which is a component part of a degree examination, to certify that he or she has attended to their satisfaction the course or courses prescribed in the Regulations for that degree."

    I was planning to explain the situation in a cover letter and to include this excerpt so the officer examining my case does not miss it. Since this letter is clearly not a transcript as described in 1, would it be enough proof?

    I really would not want to wait up to 5 month to submit the application but I also would not want to waste the money of the application fee.

    I also hold a PGCert from another UK university but I read in the guidance that this certificate is not accepted.

    Many thanks!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by DrRosFranklin View Post
      Hello,

      I am planning to use the PhD that I was awarded by a UK university to prove that I meet the language requirement in my UK citizenship application by naturalisation and I just realised that I misplaced the certificate (I blame the numerous house moves). The university will take up to 5 months to reissue a new certificate but I did not want to wait that long - my plan was to submit my application in the next couple of weeks. I have an original and official letter from the university with my name, the name of the institution, my degree and confirmation of the award. However, the letter clearly states the following regarding the transcripts:

      "No official transcripts are issued for research degrees by [name of university] and no records are kept of hours of attendance. The relevant teachers are required, however, before a student enters for any examination which is a component part of a degree examination, to certify that he or she has attended to their satisfaction the course or courses prescribed in the Regulations for that degree."

      I was planning to explain the situation in a cover letter and to include this excerpt so the officer examining my case does not miss it. Would this be enough proof?

      I really would not want to wait up to 5 month to submit the application but I also would not want to waste the money of the application fee.
      Afternoon,

      You may want to refer to this post:Lost or missing degree certificates and diplomas.

      ...where you'll see:

      If you have misplaced your degree certificate, you can prove you have a degree with the following documents:
      • an original and official transcript with your name, the name of the institution, your degree and confirmation of the award; or
      • an original and official letter from your university confirming it can’t reissue your certificate or when it will be issued.
      The letter must include:
      • your name
      • your degree
      • the date the degree was or will be awarded.

      I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities.

      Comment


      • #4

        Originally posted by DrRosFranklin View Post
        I also hold a PGCert from another UK university but I read in the guidance that this certificate is not accepted.
        If you look here: Degrees and qualifications - UKCEN Citizenship and Residence for European Nationals and their families

        ...you'll see:
        Diplomas, PgDips, PgCerts, PGCEs, and professional diplomas

        Postgraduate Diplomas (PgDips) may be accepted

        Please note that PgDips are not the same as PgCerts, PGCEs, and professional diplomas, which as per the Home Office guidance are not accepted.

        PGCEs are not acceptable. A caseworker may have erroneously accepted it on one particular occasion, but such a decision cannot be relied upon.

        Pages 20-21 of the Knowledge of language and life in the UK refer to acceptable and non acceptable diplomas.

        I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities.

        Comment


        • #5
          You may want to refer to the following resources which are the starting point for citizenship applications:If you are an EEA national, you may also want to consider the potential impact of becoming British if you wish to sponsor family members in the future: Impact on family members

          I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have included both posts here, the response above still applies.

            I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for your response.

              From your explanation I gather that the letter that I have is not sufficient - is my understanding correct?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DrRosFranklin View Post
                Thanks for your response.

                From your explanation I gather that the letter that I have is not sufficient - is my understanding correct?
                It all depends on what the letter says, as noted above:
                • an original and official letter from your university confirming it can’t reissue your certificate or when it will be issued.
                The letter must include:
                • your name
                • your degree
                • the date the degree was or will be awarded

                I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The letter that I have is a "STATEMENT OF AWARD" which includes:
                  • My full name
                  • Qualification: Doctor of Philosophy
                  • Qualification awarded: PhD [Name of PhD]
                  • The date the degree was awarded: DD/MMM/YYYY
                  • Mode of attendance: full time
                  Additionally, the letter includes the following paragraphs:

                  "All UCL programmes are taught in English. Assessment is in English unless the purpose of the assessment is to test ability in another language.

                  Students registered on a full-time basis were expected to devote approximately 35 hours per week to their studies and to attend the course for periods of at least 24 weeks in the year. Students registered on a part-time basis were permitted to be in attendance for a maximum of 15 hours per week. The minimum duration for a full time PHD degree was three years.

                  No official transcripts are issued for research degrees by UCL and no records are kept of hours of attendance. The relevant teachers are required, however, before a student enters for any examination which is a component part of a degree examination, to certify that the student has attended to their satisfaction the course or courses prescribed in the regulations for that degree
                  "

                  The university cannot say that the certificate can't be reissued - it can be reissued and it currently takes 5 months to do so, which is too long for me to wait.

                  Since this statement (the certificate can't be reissued) is missing in the letter, does it mean that the letter will not be accepted as proof that I meet the language requirement?

                  Many thanks!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DrRosFranklin View Post
                    The letter that I have is a "STATEMENT OF AWARD" which includes:
                    • My full name
                    • Qualification: Doctor of Philosophy
                    • Qualification awarded: PhD [Name of PhD]
                    • The date the degree was awarded: DD/MMM/YYYY
                    • Mode of attendance: full time
                    Additionally, the letter includes the following paragraphs:

                    "All UCL programmes are taught in English. Assessment is in English unless the purpose of the assessment is to test ability in another language.

                    Students registered on a full-time basis were expected to devote approximately 35 hours per week to their studies and to attend the course for periods of at least 24 weeks in the year. Students registered on a part-time basis were permitted to be in attendance for a maximum of 15 hours per week. The minimum duration for a full time PHD degree was three years.

                    No official transcripts are issued for research degrees by UCL and no records are kept of hours of attendance. The relevant teachers are required, however, before a student enters for any examination which is a component part of a degree examination, to certify that the student has attended to their satisfaction the course or courses prescribed in the regulations for that degree
                    "

                    The university cannot say that the certificate can't be reissued - it can be reissued and it currently takes 5 months to do so, which is too long for me to wait.

                    Since this statement (the certificate can't be reissued) is missing in the letter, does it mean that the letter will not be accepted as proof that I meet the language requirement?

                    Many thanks!
                    Tim M (lawyer) Would you be able to comment on whether the above would be acceptable for the purpose of the language requirement?

                    I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If it was my application I would apply straightaway for a new certificate and then even if that takes 5 months (which is probably the worst case scenario) you would then be able to show you have applied for it and can provide it later. Then you could probably submit with that letter

                      I am an Immigration Adviser with Commonwealth Immigration. I am also a volunteer with UKCEN, where I provide one-off advice on a pro-bono basis. This advice should not be considered a substitute for formal legal advice. Please see Tim M for full details.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        or you could just sit the English language test which would ensure a completely zero risk approach

                        I am an Immigration Adviser with Commonwealth Immigration. I am also a volunteer with UKCEN, where I provide one-off advice on a pro-bono basis. This advice should not be considered a substitute for formal legal advice. Please see Tim M for full details.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks very much to both of you for your advice on this. I'm glad I checked with you before submitting the application!

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X