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CSI do I need in to apply for citizenship?

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  • CSI do I need in to apply for citizenship?

    Hi

    My partner plans to apply for British Citizenship, however, there is a lot of confusion about CSI. He is not sure whether to apply or not because he does not want to waste more than £1000.

    His background:
    He came to the UK with his father when he was 13 years old in 2012.
    His mother was already living in the UK for some time when they joined her, but she has not been working since the end of 2012 because she was taking care of her children. His father is working in the UK since 2012 and hasn't had any gaps in his employment.
    He started secondary school at the beginning of 2013 and then continued his education until July 2017. In 2017 he was living in the UK for 5 years.
    When he finished the sixth form, he decided to take a gap year and start the university course in Sep 2018. During his gap year, he was working.
    Between 2018 and the beginning of 2021 he was a student. Between his 1st and 2nd year he was working and unfortunately, he could not work between his 2nd and 3rd year due to his disability, but he was registered as a self-employed since the beginning of 2020.
    A couple of months after graduation he got a job, and he is a full-time worker now.
    He is currently living 9 years in the UK.

    He was granted Settled Status in 2019 on his own, not based on his parents.


    He wants to apply for British Citizenship after he will pass the "Life in the UK" exam, and he does not need to pass any English exam because his degree was taught in English (after all he studied in the UK).

    The questions are:
    1. Does he need to prove that he had CSI (which he did not have as he came across this term the first time when reading AN guidance)?
    2. When filling an online form (see attached picture) which box does he need to tick? Just the first one?
    3. Can he use a letter from school/university and payslips to confirm that he was living in the UK since 2012?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Anonymous View Post
    Hi

    My partner plans to apply for British Citizenship, however, there is a lot of confusion about CSI. He is not sure whether to apply or not because he does not want to waste more than £1000.

    His background:
    He came to the UK with his father when he was 13 years old in 2012.
    His mother was already living in the UK for some time when they joined her, but she has not been working since the end of 2012 because she was taking care of her children. His father is working in the UK since 2012 and hasn't had any gaps in his employment.
    He started secondary school at the beginning of 2013 and then continued his education until July 2017. In 2017 he was living in the UK for 5 years.
    When he finished the sixth form, he decided to take a gap year and start the university course in Sep 2018. During his gap year, he was working.
    Between 2018 and the beginning of 2021 he was a student. Between his 1st and 2nd year he was working and unfortunately, he could not work between his 2nd and 3rd year due to his disability, but he was registered as a self-employed since the beginning of 2020.
    A couple of months after graduation he got a job, and he is a full-time worker now.
    He is currently living 9 years in the UK.

    He was granted Settled Status in 2019 on his own, not based on his parents.


    He wants to apply for British Citizenship after he will pass the "Life in the UK" exam, and he does not need to pass any English exam because his degree was taught in English (after all he studied in the UK).

    The questions are:
    1. Does he need to prove that he had CSI (which he did not have as he came across this term the first time when reading AN guidance)?
    Morning,

    There's been a lot of confusion surrounding this infamous requirement, which was required under EU rules to be lawfully resident as a student or a self-sufficient person. Not by minors who were dependent on their family members.

    If you look here: Dependent children

    ...you'll see:
    EEA nationals who are exercising treaty rights can sponsor their family members who are not.

    People who were living with their EEA national parents when they were children, and one or both of them were qualified persons (such as working or self employed), will have been lawfully resident on these basis and would have acquired PR status.

    Instead of sending off evidence that you were exercising treaty rights for five years, you send of evidence that they were exercising treaty rights and that you were in the UK as their dependent.

    According to the EEA Regulations, a child family member is automatically a dependent if they are under 21, and can be considered a family member if they are over 21 and living with the family member or financially dependent on them.

    If you can prove that you acquired PR status when you were a child, you would have acquired PR status if you are well over the age of 21 at the time you need to prove this.

    A child is automatically a dependent if under 21, however, they can still be considered as a dependent if they are over 21 and living with the family, or financially dependent on them.



    I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

    Comment


    • #3
      As can be seen above, children don't need to be covered by CSI while they are in school or college. As the child's father was working (assuming his dad is an EU national), then the child would have acquired PR status automatically after living here for 5 years as a dependent of his dad. Dad would also have acquired PR status after working here for 5 continuous years. So, if you look at this other post: Evidence for dependants and family applications

      ...you'll see:
      The evidence would for the sponsor, i.e. the family member who was exercising treaty rights for 5 years. The Home Office guidance for PR applications says the following:
      • evidence of exercising treaty rights for EEA national sponsor, such as 5 consecutive P60s if employed. Otherwise, see the relevant guidance for self-employed and self-sufficient; and
      • proof of relationship between the applicant and the sponsor (one of either a marriage certificate, birth certificate, adoption certificate)
      • For the applicant, one piece of evidence for every qualifying 12 month period to confirm residence in the UK; and
      • one piece of evidence for every qualifying 12 month period to confirm ongoing residence in the UK if more than 2 years has elapsed since the end of the activities.
      See: Evidence of residence - this is to prove the sponsor's residence for the purposes of exercising treaty rights and/or acquiring PR status.
      Citizenship applicants will also need to provide evidence of their own residence during the last 3 or 5 years, as noted here: Evidence of residence

      I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Anonymous View Post

        He was granted Settled Status in 2019 on his own, not based on his parents.
        This makes no difference to the application, since under 21s are still regarded as dependent on their parents for the purpose of lawful under EU rules, as noted above.

        Originally posted by Anonymous View Post
        He wants to apply for British Citizenship after he will pass the "Life in the UK" exam, and he does not need to pass any English exam because his degree was taught in English (after all he studied in the UK).
        If he has a degree from a UK university, then that would satisfy the language requirement, as noted here: Degrees and qualifications

        ...Where you'll note:
        UK Degrees

        You will have met the language requirement if:
        • You have an academic qualification which is either a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree or PhD in the UK;

        I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

        Comment


        • #5

          Originally posted by Anonymous View Post

          2. When filling an online form (see attached picture) which box does he need to tick? Just the first one?
          Both boxes need to be ticked regardless, even by people who were never students. The wording says IF... A student in this context refers to an adult who came here to study independently from their parents, not to a child in education, as above.

          Originally posted by Anonymous View Post
          3. Can he use a letter from school/university and payslips to confirm that he was living in the UK since 2012?
          Yes, if you look here: Evidence of residence

          ...you'll see:
          • Documentary evidence that indicates presence in the UK during the relevant 3 or 5 years. This can be in the form of letters from employers, educational establishments or other Government Departments. A sample of these documents, at least one from each of the 3 or 5 years, should be submitted.
          Note that he only needs evidence of residence during the last 5 years. Evidence of lawful residence is also only required for the last 5 years, however, this lawful residence can be based on previously acquired PR status as noted above. In this case, it would be necessary to provide the evidence of the sponsor (the father in this case) exercising treaty rights while he was in school, as per posts above. This can be easily explained in the cover letter.

          I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

          Comment


          • #6
            You may want to refer to the following resources which are the starting point for citizenship applications:And you may also want to consider the potential impact of becoming British if you wish to sponsor family members in the future: Impact on family members

            I am the Site Manager and Webmaster, please refer to our Admin Team, Roles and Responsibilities. If you think we have helped in any way, please support us so we can keep helping others secure their status, it is now more important than ever now EEA nationals are subject to the same immigration requirements as non EEA nationals and require proof of valid status in the UK.

            Comment

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