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Permanent Residence (PR)

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Permanent Residence under EU law, how it's acquired and how to apply for a PR card. Please note PR cards will stop being valid at the end of 2020, you should apply for settled status instead. This information is mostly for the benefit of parents of UK born children who would be British from birth if at least one parent had acquired PR status before the birth.

Permanent Residence under EU law, how it's acquired and how to apply for a PR card. Please note PR cards will stop being valid at the end of 2020, you should apply for settled status instead. This information is mostly for the benefit of parents of UK born children who would be British from birth if at least one parent had acquired PR status before the birth.

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  • Evidence of residence for PR applications

    Please note the evidence below is for the purpose of proving residence during a period of exercising treaty rights and/or for later years after PR status was acquired, to show PR status was not lost through an absence of two years or longer, this isn't the same as the evidence required for citizenship applications.

    See: Evidence of residence for citizenship applicants


    The Home Office guidance says:

    If you are an EEA national relying...
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  • Qualifying periods and evidence - example scenarios

    Qualifying periods and evidence - example scenarios

    Residence evidence: Scenario 1
    I have lived in the UK since 1998, as a student and looking after my children until 2003. Started working in 2003 until now. I am applying using 2011-2016 as qualifying period, do I have to prove my residence also for the years before 2011? If so, for how many years before 2011 shall I provide evidence?

    No, strictly speaking the residence evidence only needs to cover the qualifying 5 years for employment/self-sufficient/self-employed person/student...
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  • Absences and PR applications

    Absences and PR applications

    The Home Office guidance says the following:



    Short absences under six months or where they do not add up to more than six months in a 12 month period do not need to be listed on the PR form.

    Absences before your chosen 5 year qualifying period need not be mentioned, regardless of length.

    Although the form asks for absences from date of entry, it is not necessary to mention them if they were before your 5...
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  • Loss of PR status and ILR through absence from the UK

    Loss of PR status and ILR through absence from the UK

    If an EEA national has the right of permanent residence in the UK, they will only lose this right if they are absent from the UK for more than 2 consecutive years. There are no other conditions they must satisfy in order to continue to have this right. So, if you leave for 18 months and then come back for a day, you will be able to preserve your permanent residence status.

    You don’t need to have a PR card to have acquired PR status.

    It is recommended...
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  • Permanent Residence (PR) status and how it's acquired

    Permanent Residence (PR) status and how it's acquired

    You acquire PR status after exercising treaty rights as a qualified person, for a continuous 5 year period, regardless of residence documentation. The PR clock starts from when you became a qualified person, i.e. a worker or self-employed person, or a student or a self-sufficient person if you were covered by CSI. The qualifying period can start as soon as the moment you arrive, as long as you become a qualified person by no later than the initial right to reside period of 3 months. A qualified...
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  • Disabled persons and PR status

    Disabled persons and PR status

    The EEA Regulations do not make special provision for people who have been disabled since they came to the UK, and people in this situation who have never worked would only be able to get PR certification if they have health insurance (as self-sufficient persons), which may well be very difficult.

    However, if you have worked in the UK for two years before having to stop due to incapacity, or if your disability or illness is a result of a work place accident or occupational...
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  • Carers

    Carers

    If you are married to or in a relationship with a UK national and have a UK national child or parent for whom you care for full time, then it is almost certainly the case that you would be regarded as someone who was not exercising treaty rights.

    The exact position of a carer, as an EU qualified person, is not straightforward. There could be a good argument to be made that you are a worker, or perhaps a self-employed person.

    Although under UK immigration rules, 'carers...
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  • Bank statements

    Bank statements

    Bank statements can be used to prove residence as well as income.

    The Home Office guidance does not require bank statements for people applying as workers (employees). If you wish to add bank statements to your existing proof of employment, it is recommended to send all pages, there is no need to obscure any details on the statement.

    Self-printed bank statements from internet banking are only accepted if they stamped by the bank. There is no validity...
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  • Benefits and PR applications

    Benefits and PR applications

    Benefits that you are legally entitled to do not stop you from applying for PR, however, if you are trying to claim that you are a self-sufficient person, some benefits may cause the Home Office to think that you are not truly self-sufficient. If you need PR certification, you should seek legal advice on this.

    Some so-called "benefits" or "public funds", such as the State Pension, etc., do not affect self-sufficiency.

    Receiving...
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  • Residence documentation for nationals of A2 countries (Bulgaria and Romania)

    Residence documentation for nationals of A2 countries (Bulgaria and Romania)

    Special rules applied to Romanian and Bulgarian nationals with effect from January 2007 until the end of December 2013.

    You were allowed to reside in the UK as a student, self-employed or self-sufficient person.

    You did not however, have an automatic right to reside as a worker, unless you were exempt from authorisation, as noted below.

    You would need to have been exempt from authorisation, or have had authorisation, to count...
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  • The Workers Registration Scheme (WRS)

    The Workers Registration Scheme (WRS)

    If you are from an A8 country and came to the UK before 1 May 2009, then you cannot automatically qualify for PR because of five years in employment starting before 1 May 2009. You will have needed to meet the conditions of the Worker Registration Scheme to rely on that period. If you didn't register and were not exempt, only periods from May 2009 can be counted towards PR.

    The extension of the WRS beyond April 2009 has been ruled unlawful by the Supreme Court, see: Supreme...
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