If you have a valid PR or biometric residence card, see: Holders of valid PR and biometric residence cards.

Otherwise, the following is required:

a relevant document issued on the basis of that relationship, such as a residence card or a family permit (EEA FP); or
full birth certificate; or
a court order, such as a special guardianship order; or
other documents which satisfy the caseworker that you are the direct descendant of the EU citizen or of their spouse or civil partner.


Children, grandchildren or great grandchildren of the non EU spouse or civil partner of an EU national need to provide:
a marriage or civil partnership certificate recognised in the UK; or
a valid overseas registration document for a same sex relationship which is entitled to be treated as a civil partnership under the Civil Partnership Act 2004.

Children, grandchildren or great grandchildren aged 21 or over who were not granted status under the scheme as an under 21 need to provide evidence of dependency on the EU family member or their spouse or civil partner.

evidence of financial dependency such as bank statements or money transfers;
evidence of needing and receiving personal care from the family member on serious health grounds, for example a letter from a hospital consultant.

Establishing dependency

See the Home Office guidance in page 60 for examples for dependence evidence:

This evidence might take the form of for example:
  • evidence of their financial dependency, such as bank statements or money transfers to the applicant from the relevant EEA citizen (or qualifying British citizen) or the spouse or civil partner
  • evidence that the applicant needs and receives (or for the relevant period did so) the personal care of the relevant EEA citizen (or qualifying British citizen), or of their spouse or civil partner, on serious health grounds, such as a letter from a hospital consultant.
A UT Judge has analysed EU case law on the meaning of “dependent” and summarised it as follows:
  1. A person is only dependent if they actually receive support from another
  2. There doesn't need to be a right to that support, and it is irrelevant that there are alternative sources of support available
  3. That support must be material, although not necessarily financial, and must provide for, or contribute towards, the basic necessities of life.

See also: Evidence for family members

Applying for your children
Source: Evidence of relationship